Division of Powers
Slovenia became a parliamentary republic when it gained its independence from Yugoslavia in June 1991. Slovenia has a bicameral parliament composed of the National Assembly (Državni zbor) and the National Council (Državni svet). The former is the general representative body of the Slovenian nation and exercises legislative and electoral powers, as well as control over the executive and judicial powers. The National Council is the representative body for social, economic, professional and local interests. Slovenia has been a member of the European Union since 2004. 

The Constitution, adopted in 1991, guarantees local self-government (Art. 9 and Art. 138 to 144). The country developed into a decentralised unitary state in 1993 as the Local Self-Government Act was adopted. This provided for territorial reorganisation and new municipalities replaced the former communes.

Slovenia is thus a decentralised unitary state composed of statistical regions, devolved State administration units and municipalities. In 2006, the Constitution was amended so as to enable the establishment of Regions, which did not exist until then. In 2012, the country has twelve statistical regions, which do not have their own governments or their own competences. In addition, Slovenia is composed of fifty-eight devolved State administrative units, which ensure State responsibilities and manage affairs falling under the area of expertise of their respective ministries at regional level. However, these units do not have the status of local government. Finally, Slovenia is composed of 212 municipalities.

State authorities supervise the legality of the work of local community authorities. According to Article 140 of the Constitution, the competencies of a municipality comprise local affairs which may be regulated by the municipality autonomously and which affect only the residents of the municipality. As for Regions, the State transfers by law the performance of specific duties within the State competence to the regions and must provide them with the necessary financial resources to enable this.

In 2010, municipal revenue amounted to almost EUR 2.18 billion.
Tax revenue represents 52% of municipal revenue, while grants and other own revenue each represent over 13% of municipal revenue. Municipalities have in addition some 21% of non-tax revenues. Own-source taxes represent 86% of municipal revenue.

General division of powers​​​

Central level

The Government has national legislative powers in all areas.
Moreover, State authorities supervise the legality of the work of local community authorities.

Regional level

Regions are established by a law which also determines their territory, seat, and name. Such laws are adopted by the National Assembly. The participation of the Municipalities must be guaranteed in the procedure of adopting the law. 

The State transfers by law the performance of specific duties within the State competence to the regions and must provide to them with the necessary financial resources to enable this.

Local level

Generally speaking, local matters of public interest as determined by law or by a municipality general act are independently performed by the municipalities.

The responsibilities devolved to municipalities are the following:

  • Fire fighting;
  • Education (pre-school, primary);
  • Primary health care;
  • Childminding facilities;
  • Family and youth assistance;
  • Rest homes;
  • Social welfare;
  • Housing;
  • Urban planning;
  • Spatial planning;
  • Water and sewage;
  • Household refuse;
  • Cemeteries;
  • Environmental protection;
  • Culture (libraries);
  • Sport and leisure;
  • Promotion of agriculture;
  • Economic development of the municipality;
  • Promotion of tourism. 

Also, urban municipalities are allowed by law to have wider responsibilities than ordinary municipalities although they have not yet implemented them.

Besides the abovementioned responsibilities, urban municipalities can have the following additional responsibilities:

  • Urban transport;
  • Urban development;
  • Catering facilities;
  • Grammar schools, secondary, vocational and higher schools;
  • Secondary-level public health services.